This article is available also in spanish here
Egypt builds its new capital
My list

Author | Eduardo BravoCairo, with its history dating back thousands of years, is one of the most attractive cities on Earth from a historical point of view. However, for that same temporal reason, its urban development is not exactly an example of sustainable growth. Cairo, covering an area of 550 square kilometers, a large number of which are protected given their incalculable cultural value, is home to over nine million people, or sixteen million if you include those living in the metropolitan area.egypt's new capitalThese figures illustrate a high population density that results in numerous complications in the life of its residents, who often suffer problems caused by a lack of correct urban planning and alternatives to private vehicles, which have led to Cairo becoming, according to Forbes magazine, the most polluted city on Earth.In addition to this, the Egyptian capital also suffers from a lack of housing, a lack of green areas and deficient infrastructures for a country which, according to official estimates, expects to receive fifteen million tourists in 2020.egypt's new capitalGiven this situation, in 2015, the Egyptian government decided to build a new capital 40 kilometers from Cairo, using smart city criteria to do so, not just in terms of traffic, access and safety management, but also in terms of population density and the distribution thereof within the territory.The total area will cover around 700 square kilometers, in which six and a half million people will live, many of whom will be public officials and diplomatic ambassadors, since the first buildings to go up were the presidential palace, the parliament, the ministries and embassy buildings.egypt's new capitalApart from public buildings, the city will have an international airport, six hundred medical facilities, two thousand schools, shopping malls, a theme park, a conference center with a capacity for five thousand spectators, thousands of mosques, various churches, museums, a park twice the size of Central Park and a university. Services which, obviously, will also need workers in order for them to function, although this does not necessarily mean these workers will be residents from the new city.The proximity to Cairo, which allows people to spend the day there and return on the same day, suggests that the population will be a floating population, particularly since the new city doesn't allocate yet for social housing or fixed-value housing. The reason for this is the Egyptian authorities’ commitment to exclusive residential neighborhoods with luxury properties, built by private foreign real estate agencies, who will have the right to sell the houses. The solution has been designed so the Egyptian government does not have to assume the entire building costs.https://youtu.be/QLFqA99fBCAIn fact, financing has been one of the main problems this ambitious project has encountered. Although the majority of the expense has been assumed by the Ministry of Defense and Military Production -the previous owner of the land on which the city will be built- and the Ministry of Housing, these contributions are not sufficient to cover the 45 billion dollars the project is estimated to cost, therefore the government has had to resort to foreign investors.Those chosen initially were companies form the Arab Emirates which, after the initial euphoria, began to dissociate themselves from the project. This led to them being replaced by Chinese companies and banks, which provided 15 billion dollars in an initial phase, and subsequently added a further 20 billion.However, disagreements with the Asian investors and Abdul Fattah al-Sisi’s government led to some of them also withdrawing from the project, leaving Egypt to provide further money for the project. This was a problem, since the country has an IMF credit of 12 billion dollars to be paid back shortly.egypt's new capitalThis situation led to the strongest detractors of the construction of the new capital one again expressing their nonconformity with the project. For urban planners, who believe a new capital is required, the location of the current one is not ideal, since it should be to the west of the Nile Valley. Those that consider the project to be unnecessary, justify their stance by stating that such a high economic investment should be used to improve other Egyptian cities, including Cairo, and not wasted on the creation of a city from scratch.There are also those who believe the project is just a propaganda strategy to improve the image of Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, the country’s current president, who, although reelected in 2018 with 97% of the votes, reached the position of power after leading the coup d'état against Mohamed Morsi, the first president of Egypt to be democratically elected.In fact, until the announcement of the results of the public tender, called to decide on the city’s definitive name, it is known as the “New Administrative Capital or “Sisi-City”, given the strong relationship with the governor, who, according to those strongest detractors, also believe that he will use the city to control the population. He would use the distribution of the land by sectors of activity and the smart management of security, traffic and resources, which enables police forces to have real-time information about anyone residing in or passing through the site.egypt's new capitalIn any event, the first phase of the 3-part project, is already at a very advanced stage. This will allow the State Administration to move to this “New Administrative Capital” in 2020. The mystery is what will happen with the two remaining stages, given that similar urban planning experiences carried out in Egypt in recent decades were not entirely successful. This is the case of the eight satellite towns built around Cairo to decongest the city center and which did not attract new inhabitants, or businesses or relevant industries, turning them into ghost towns. A risk that also hovers over this “New Cairo”.Images | Simon Matzinger | UDC5

Related content
Fujisawa Sustainable Smart Town: planning for the next 100 years
Fujisawa Sustainable Smart Town: planning for the next 100 years
Ville Radieuse: Why did Le Corbusier’s Radiant City fail?
Ville Radieuse: Why did Le Corbusier’s Radiant City fail?
Sustainable architecture: design, materials and more about sustainable buildings
Sustainable architecture: design, materials and more about sustainable buildings
China land reclamation projects: the country with the most land reclaimed from the sea
China land reclamation projects: the country with the most land reclaimed from the sea
What happened to Dubai man-made islands?
What happened to Dubai man-made islands?
Barcelona 92: the impact of hosting the Olympics in the interest of global exposure
Barcelona 92: the impact of hosting the Olympics in the interest of global exposure
The SMART Port concept: proposing a more social, resilient and environmental port model
The SMART Port concept: proposing a more social, resilient and environmental port model
Smart tunnel: what is it, how does it work and the real example of Malaysia
Smart tunnel: what is it, how does it work and the real example of Malaysia
The Eden Project: What is the purpose of this sustainable city?
The Eden Project: What is the purpose of this sustainable city?
Reclaiming land from the sea: A solution to climate change or an even bigger problem?
Reclaiming land from the sea: A solution to climate change or an even bigger problem?
Angkor: 1000 years since the first major smart city
Angkor: 1000 years since the first major smart city
Seismic reinforcement: how it works and why it is so important
Seismic reinforcement: how it works and why it is so important
Smart cities: The challenges of building a future-ready workforce
Smart cities: The challenges of building a future-ready workforce
Healthy, peaceful and more equitable – life in the low-car city
Healthy, peaceful and more equitable – life in the low-car city
Climate-smart infrastructures: principles and technology
Climate-smart infrastructures: principles and technology
What is mixed-use development? Analysis of pros & cons
What is mixed-use development? Analysis of pros & cons
What is digital infrastructure and examples of its application
What is digital infrastructure and examples of its application
Exercise and urban gyms: the solution for staying fit in cities
Exercise and urban gyms: the solution for staying fit in cities
This is how Venice wants to save itself
This is how Venice wants to save itself
Financing urban infrastructure
Financing urban infrastructure
Building sustainable cities with wooden skyscrapers
Building sustainable cities with wooden skyscrapers
Building resilient smart cities in a post-pandemic world
Building resilient smart cities in a post-pandemic world
Empty office buildings are still devouring energy. Why?
Empty office buildings are still devouring energy. Why?
Decarbonizing Cities - How to Harmonize Buildings, Mobility and Infrastructure
Decarbonizing Cities - How to Harmonize Buildings, Mobility and Infrastructure
Buildings, firms tap smart tech to monitor operations
Buildings, firms tap smart tech to monitor operations
What is a digital twin?
What is a digital twin?
Indian smart cities offer a model for pandemic recovery
Indian smart cities offer a model for pandemic recovery
Urban planning and COVID-19: lessons learned and future challenges
Urban planning and COVID-19: lessons learned and future challenges
CQC/Qicheng: Photocell, Intelligent controller enclosure and dimming receptacle/socket for smart streetlights
CQC/Qicheng: Photocell, Intelligent controller enclosure and dimming receptacle/socket for smart streetlights
Maximising the potential of smart city investments
Maximising the potential of smart city investments
The road to smart city infrastructure starts with research
The road to smart city infrastructure starts with research
Connecting urban environments with IoT and Digital Twins
Connecting urban environments with IoT and Digital Twins
Microsoft: Smart Places and Infrastructure with IoT, AI, and Digital Twins
Microsoft: Smart Places and Infrastructure with IoT, AI, and Digital Twins
[ui!] Urban Software Institute: Mobility for your whole life
[ui!] Urban Software Institute: Mobility for your whole life
AI, image recognition and cloud computing: how do smart ports work?
AI, image recognition and cloud computing: how do smart ports work?
Advantages (and the odd disadvantage) of 3D urban planning
Advantages (and the odd disadvantage) of 3D urban planning
More than just pine and cement: guidelines for smart urban furniture
More than just pine and cement: guidelines for smart urban furniture
Smart infrastructures, the key to more resilient and efficient cities
Smart infrastructures, the key to more resilient and efficient cities
An administrative building in Dubai, the largest 3D printed structure in the world
An administrative building in Dubai, the largest 3D printed structure in the world
Smart Buildings for Smart Workers: improving the efficiency of workers and buildings
Smart Buildings for Smart Workers: improving the efficiency of workers and buildings
Five impossible Smart City projects with our existing technology
Five impossible Smart City projects with our existing technology
Smart hospitals: cities within cities
Smart hospitals: cities within cities
Google is building the city of the future in Toronto
Google is building the city of the future in Toronto
How a Smart Home works: infographic
How a Smart Home works: infographic
Pontus Westerberg, UN-Habitat:
Pontus Westerberg, UN-Habitat: "People need to be allowed to offer their own solutions to the problems in the places in which they live"
Jakarta is sinking and now Indonesia has to find a new capital
Jakarta is sinking and now Indonesia has to find a new capital
Digital twins and urban planning: how to use replicas to building the cities of tomorrow
Digital twins and urban planning: how to use replicas to building the cities of tomorrow
Can parks be smart? These are the key aspects that define a Smart Park
Can parks be smart? These are the key aspects that define a Smart Park
Floating cities: history and future of a sustainable dream that could one day come true
Floating cities: history and future of a sustainable dream that could one day come true
Singapore experiments with its digital twin to improve city life
Singapore experiments with its digital twin to improve city life
Recommended profiles for you
Remember to activate your profile to network!
Activate profile
Maximilian Schmidinger
Maximilian Schmidinger
IE University
Student & Incumbent Class Representative of the MRED Class of 2021.
Ahmad  AFANEN
Ahmad AFANEN
Middle East University
Assistant professor in civil engineering
MG
MARIALUISA GIORDANINO
TIM
senior consultant
NM
NILSON MENDOZA
Nichol Contratistas
my role in the company is to supervise the construction process of the different projects.
Dharm Singh Jat
Dharm Singh Jat
Namibia University of Acience and Technology
Professor
AE
Azza El Hajjar
Dar al Handasah
Urban designer
AP
Adarsh Patil
Infosys
Designer works in urban design
rudy samosir
rudy samosir
indonesian architect
expert
IO
Ian Oppermann
University of Technology Sydney
Industry Professor
SA
Suraj Awale
Architect Suraj Awale & Associates
Architect
Stephane Escabasse
Stephane Escabasse
Oxidum Advisory Services
CEO
Harianto Harianto
Harianto Harianto
goverment
public relations designer in government
SR
Sergio Richetti
Agencia de Sistemas de Informacion - GCABA
Director of infraestructure
KN
Karen Nava
NLC
Visual Design Director
JM
Jose Martins
cbic
presidente
VS
Venkatesh S K
Skives Marketing
Consultant
MG
María Constanza García
GRUPO SEMANA
Director Semana Educacion
James Fee
James Fee
Fee.Digital
James is the founder and President of Fee.Digital, a Digital Twin consulting company.
Jaime Molina Miguel
Jaime Molina Miguel
UPM
Student
Selouane Karim
Selouane Karim
RESALLIENCE
CEO & Founder

Only accessible for registered users
This content is available only for registered users
TO: $$toName$$
SUBJECT: Message from $$fromName$$